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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the waters." this is a paperback version. you won a pulitzer prize for this. how many hardback copies did you sell and how many of these paperbacks up to today? >> guest: i would have to talk to my publisher. only be a rough estimate of 100,000 heart attacks and 200 or maybe 300,000 paperbacks which it is peanuts for stephen king for a big six history book based on a subject that might make some people uncomfortable, but other people for me at least it's a great leveling transformation to hear. there's a lot of black heroes and white heroes. it's a cross-cultural drama. c-span: your credit -- i think it is an outfit called lyndhurst of chattanooga -- and the macarthur of chicago and the ford foundation as places that have given you money over the years; is the right? >> guest: yes. after "parting the waters" came out, because this book has taken nine years. the ford foundation gave me my first and only a research grant that i used to hire somebody for tw
which dr. king could not resist, and lyndon johnson couldn't. they were constantly being pushed from below by people who wanted action. johnson becomes president on november 22, 1963. he is an accidental president. he had been in the backwaters of the vice-presidency. heed been drinking too much. he was fat. he was unhappy. he was cantankerous, and he was a forgotten man. martin luther king, on that day, faced a crisis of his own. the civil rights legislation that john f. kennedy finally introduced in june of '63, pushed by the demonstrations in birmingham, which revealed the police dogs dogs and the fire h. suddenly the government had to act. the first great accomplishment of lynn johnson son, that not much attention is given to, is the magnificent way he assumed the presidency. this was a nation in crisis. we had a cold war going on. in which the -- there was huge fear of russian missiles heading our way. our president had been killed. we didn't know whether it was the russians who had kill him or castro or -- it was great, great uncertainty. and johnson came to that job, reassured
dr. king's with president obama. but earlier, it was that speech. and he defied expectations again. there were specifics on voting, on gay rights, on women's rights, on climate change, on immigration, on gun control. and he defended the big three entitlements. joining me now is democratic senator from ohio, broun. what a speech. how surprised were you at the tone and the specifics in this speech? >> i wasn't surprised. i mean, we had very high expectations for him. he delivered. i loved the line as barney frank and others mentioned from seneca falls to selma to stonewall and i think that says a couple things. it says, one, how we've moved forward as a nation and we should acknowledge that at the inauguration. and, second, it underscores how none of those were easy. you know everything about civil rights and what happens with women's rights and what happens with gay rights. it's always a battle tomorrow that starts. and the president, i like how he is engaged with organizing for action. and i like how he knows that the country is behind him but needs to remind the congress that it's
is live here in d.c. tonight. also the day the nation honors dr. martin luther king jr. and the president said he really drew inspiration from dr. king and abraham lincoln for today's speech, ed. >> that's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this co
, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealous. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
to cast them in terms and in tones that honored the founders, that honored dr. king, honored the best in the country. and i think in the old way of seeing things, that would be a left thing to do. he is speaking though to the emerging majority in america which is brown, young, which is much more open to the ideas around marriage equality. he is speaking to the america that is rising. i don't think that's left versus right. i think it is right versus wrong in the context of the new majority. >> if i can disagree a little. it seems to me to be left when you say government can't cure society's ills alone. in other words, the center of curing society's ills is always government. on occasion, government needs a little help. no, no, he said that today though. he is being misquoted. >> a critical distinction between the way president reagan articulated his philosophy and the way president obama did today, president reagan and many on the right begin from a premise of negativity. government is the problem, not the solution said president reagan. president obama did not bash business. he did n
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
, beverly mckinney sees living proof of dr. king's dream realized. >> you as an individual have the opportunity to make a difference in this world. if you don't do that, it was all nor naught. >> reporter: a message these former southern californians say has inspired own family. their son won the presidential award for academics and a trip they hope will stay with him forever. >> i tell my son, strive for the best, maybe you could be the first hispanic. >> and christin ayers is in washington for this morning's inaugural event. >> and she joins us by the phone from the national mall where the stage is set and security is mighty tight as well. good morning, give us your impressions. you've been there i would imagine several hours so far just going through security and whatnot, right. >> reporter: that's right, we have been here for hours and security is tight. we stood in line for about 3 1/2 hours trying to get through a media entrance and were later let through along with the rest of the general public. a chilly morning standing out and wait
's going to be west. >> cenk: i think that's important. >> that's where the gray area comes in. dr. king wanted a certain person in office but not strictly based on color but what he does. it's not based on color but what he does. cornell was not saying you shouldn't swear on the bible but you can't say that but not carry it out with fruition. >> cenk: you thought that dr. west went too far before. you largely agree with him. >> no matter after that, anything he says is valid isn't this the crazy guy? you don't want to listen to what he has to say. now let's not let his good comments go to waste. >> cenk: we have to leave it there. chris geithner, michael shure thanks so much, guys, great conversation. >> thank you. >> cenk: now when we come back, well lupe fiasco is a guy we've had on this show. they invited him invited him to sing, it was anti-obama. [ ♪ singing ♪ ] the sirius xm satellite radio in the 2013 ram 1500. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> cenk: all rig
saved the union and had to fight a war, but 100 years later, it was dr. martin luther king, who had to fight another war, a war of ideas and a war of values, look how we have progressed just from the 50 years of martin luther king. i became secretary of state. i became a chairman. as a kid in the south bronx section, unthinkable. and barack obama became president of the united states. >> you had stinging things to say about the republican party. an identity problem, you said. and that there are some people who seem to have a theme of intolerance. >> that's a broader definition of what i meant by intolerance. i think intolerance is when you try to keep people from voting. the republican party ought to be out there, not by restricting voting by requiring i.d., but wanting everybody to vote. you need new messages. new policies. the country is becoming more minority. >> have you heard a lot from that? a lot of people pushing back on you? >> most of the people i've heard from in the last week or so have been very, very supportive. but there are those who consider this the worst thing ima
'll come through the rotunda, walk by that bust of dr. martin luther king, jr., and then into statuary hall for a tradition that's the most exclusive lunch you can imagine. all of the nation's leaders, the president, the vice president, congressional leaders, supreme court justices, their spouses, they will all gather for a lunch to put politics aside for at least a brief moment. >> thank you very much, jan. >>> as we watch the president's motorcade approaching the capitol, let me give you a little bit of an advanced look on what you're seeing as the inauguration ceremonies proceed. as we mentioned, senator charles schumer of new york will be the master of ceremonies. he will have a short speech and then he will be introducing myrlie evers-williams, a former chair of the naacp and the widow of medgar evers. the naacp field secretary who was gunned down in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on t
proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious american public watching. a lot of them would really like to see some folks getting along in washington. what are the prospects for that? >> the prospects are very bright. we're going to continue to work together and pull together, to look out for the common good. one thing i have endured the past three years was a group -- taking democrats and republicans, blacks, whites, latinos, asian americans back to som
of recognizes dr. king's birthday and commitment to that agenda. we were at the church service and the agenda i don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on t
. that's quite new. but also in addition to what dr. peterson said, martin luther king opposed gun sales. he was very much for gun violence laws and rules. so it's just -- they don't even begin to know where to start unraveling all these mistruths these desperate gun nuts are putting out there, but we know they are losing the public debate and isolating themselves and that increasingly there's not so much a silent majority, there's a very vocal majority wanting some common sense changes. >> they lose the public debate. let's follow the money on this one. i'm going to remain a bit cynical. >> exactly. >> james peterson and julian epstein, thanks so much for joining me. >> thank you, karen. >>> next, how to talk to women. it's a new class being offered at the republicans' annual retreat. stay with us. >> what do you say we go out on a date, have some chicken, maybe some sex. you know, see what happens. >> oh, let me get this over here. sorry. there it is. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make t
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)